A murder rate of 183 per 100,000 inhabitants made San Pedro Sula (Honduras) the most violent city in the world



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Latin American cities are the
most dangerous in the world

Research and analysis by City Mayors staff*

12 November 2014: Latin America's cities are the most dangerous in the world. Drug trafficking, gang wars, political instability, corruption, and poverty combine are the main causes of the continent’s extreme urban violence. Residents of cities in Brazil, Mexico and Colombia are particularly at risk of being caught up in battles between warring gangs. For the third year running, San Pedro Sula, a city of some 720,000 people in northern Honduras is thought to be the most dangerous city in the world with 187 murders per 100,000 inhabitants per annum (187 HTIs*). With 134 HTIs, Venezuela’s capital Caracas is the second most murderous city in the global ranking, with Acapulco in third place. Cape Town, Detroit and New Orleans are the cities with the highest murder rates outside Latin America.

While security in San Pedro has worsened during the past three years – the city’s murder rate has gone up from 125 HTIs in 2010 to 187 in 2013 - Ciudad Juárez, on the Mexican-US border, has slipped down the ranking of murder cities. Between 2008 and 2010, the city became infamous as the murder capital of the world. During those years, the city’s annual murder rate per 100,000 residents regularly surpassed 220. It is has now dropped to 38.


The 50 most dangerous cities in the world
Rank
City
Country
Murder rate
(HTIs*, with 2011 figures in brackets)
1
San Pedro Sula Honduras
187 (159)
2
Caracas Venezuela
134 (99)
3
Acapulco Mexico
113 (128)
4
Cali Colombia
83 (78)
5
Maceió Brazil
80 (135)
6
Capital District Honduras
79 (100)
7
Fortaleza Brazil
73
8
Guatemala City Guatemala
68 (75)
9
João Pessoa Brazil
67
10
Barquisimeto Venezuela
65 (55)
11
Palmira Colombia
61
12
Natal Brazil
58
13
Salvador Brazil
58 (57)
14
Vitoria Brazil
57 (68)
15
Sao Luis Brazil
57
16
Culiacán Mexico
55 (74)
17
Ciudad Guayana Venezuela
54 (59)
18
Torreón Mexico
54 (88)
19
Kingston Jamaica
53 (47)
20
Cape Town South Africa
51 (46)
21
Chihuahua City Mexico
50 (83)
22
Victoria Mexico
49
23
Belém Brazil
48 (78(
24
Detroit USA
47 (48)
25
Campina Grande Brazil
46
26
New Orleans USA
45 (58)
27
San Salvador El Salvador
45 (57)
28
Goiânia Brazil
45
29
Cuiabá Brazil
44
30
Nuevo Laredo Mexico
41
31
Manaus Brazil
43 (51)
32
Santa Marta Colombia
42
33
Cúcuta Colombia
42 (56)
34
Pereira Colombia
40
35
Medellin Colombia
38
36
Baltimore USA
38 (31)
37
Ciuadad Juárez Mexico
38 (148)
38
San Juan Puerto Rico
37 (53)
39
Recife Brazil
37 (48)
40
Macapá Brazil
37
41
Nelson Mandela Bay South Africa
36
42
Maracaibo Venezuela
35
43
Cuernavaca Mexico
35
44
Belo Horizonte Brazil
35
45
St Louis USA
34
46
Aracaju Brazil
33
47
Tijuana Mexico
33
48
Durban South Africa
32 (31)
49
Port-au-Prince Haiti
30
50
Valencia Venezuela
30

*The Mexican NGO Consejo Ciudadano para la Seguridad Publica y la Justicia (CCSP) researches murder rates in the world. The rate of murder (homicidio doloso) is expressed as a figure per 100,000 inhabitants (of a city or country) in a year (abbreviated here as HTI): i.e. 50/100,000 or 50/HTI.






The documentary '8 Murders a Day' investigates the situation in Juarez, which used to have the second-highest murder rate in the world


On other pages
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