Mass shootings in the USA

ON THIS PAGE: Two school massacres in 2018: Report from states and cities ||| Table 1: Mass shootings in individual US states ||| Table 2: Mass shootings in individual US cities ||| Data source & methodology |||



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Despite two school massacres in 2018
America’s gun culture will not change
Latest report from US states and cities
22 May 2018: Since America did nothing after 20 primary school children and six adults were massacred at Sandy Hook (Connecticut) in December 2012, there is little hope that the latest mass killings at American schools will change the country’s fascination with guns or its quasi-religious belief in the US Constitution’s Second Amendment. On 14 February 2018, 17 students were shot dead at a high school in Parkland, Florida by a 19-year old teenager, using the same type of gun that was used at Sandy Hook, while on 18 May 2018, a 17-year old student shot dead 10 people and wounded 13 others at Santa Fe High School (Houston) Texas.

At the May 2018 annual meeting of the National Rifle Association (NRA), which was also attended by US President Donald Trump, Texas Governor Greg Abbott said: “The problem is not guns. The problem is hearts without God.” Three years ago, in 2015, the Texas Governor tweeted he was embarrassed that Texas lagged behind California in gun sales.

While Barrack Obama was still US President, mayors made a passionate stand against the country’s gun lobby, saying that that the lives of ordinary Americans must not be put in danger by allowing owners of assault weapons to pursue their hobbies. But since then, the number of mass shootings and gun related deaths in US cities has risen further, culminating in the Las Vegas massacre on 1 October 2017, the Sutherland Springs mass shooting on 5 November 2017, the massacre at Parkland, Florida and the school mass shooting in Santa Fe, Texas.

There have been very few suggestions to re-write the Second Amendment, which supposedly guarantees every American citizen the right to keep and bear arms: “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” While in most cases before it, the US Supreme Court sided with the gun lobby’s interpretation of the Second Amendment, some scholars argue that its authors meant to say that citizens had the right to form and join armed militias to defend themselves against enemies.

In 2017, some 15,600 Americans (excluding suicides) were killed by guns, an increase of some 500 deaths compared to 2016. The death toll in 2015 amounted 13,500, while in the first six weeks of 2018,, gun related incidents were already responsible for  almost 1,900 deaths. The number of mass shootings, with four or more victims, increased from 271 in 2014 to 346 in 2017.

While there is no agreement on what drives the relentless increase in gun violence, several research studies have shown that one of the main risk factors for gun crime is the availability of guns. More guns, more crime! Ironically, the Obama administration’s perceived drive to crackdown on gun ownership may have led to a stockpiling of guns, while under President Trump, gun owners don’t fear a federal ‘gun grab’.


Number of mass shootings in US states
from 1 January 2017 to 20 May 2018

State
No of Incidents
No of Deaths
No of Injured
Alabama
13
11
60
Arizona
4
1
15
Arkansas
5
3
42
California
46
46
186
Colorado
3
7
10
Connecticut
2
0
8
Delaware
1
0
4
Florida
34
45
156
Georgia
10
9
41
Illinois
39
27
172
Indiana
10
7
41
Iowa
2
1
8
Kansas
5
12
15
Kentucky
10
9
51
Louisiana
20
20
75
Maine
1
4
1
Maryland
9
9
29
Massachusetts
1
0
4
Michigan
13
18
42
Minnesota
5
4
19
Mississippi
16
25
58
Missouri
15
24
44
Montana
1
3
2
Nebraska
2
0
10
Nevada
2
61
502
New Jersey
16
13
54
New Mexico
2
7
4
New York
19
6
59
North Carolina
13
21
41
Ohio
21
20
93
Oklahoma
3
3
11
Pennsylvania
19
19
65
South Carolina
8
6
36
Tennessee
19
16
81
Texas
28
77
119
Utah
2
3
6
Virginia
15
11
56
Washington
5
4
18
Washington DC
8
3
33
Wisconsin
2
5
4
TOTAL
436
549
2215


Number of mass shootings in selected US cities
from 1 January 2017 to 20 May 2018

City
No of Incidents
No of Deaths
No of Injured
Antioch (TN)
1
4
3
Atlanta (GA)
4
7
12
Austin (TX)
2
1
7
Baltimore (MD)
7
5
23
Chicago (IL)
32
27
124
Cincinatti (OH)
4
3
34
Cleveland (OH)
7
7
26
Chester (PA)
1
4
0
Colorado Springs (CO)
2
5
5
Columbus (OH)
2
1
13
Dallas (TX)
4
5
12
Des Moines (IA)
2
1
8
Detroit (MI)
7
15
19
Fort Worth (TX)
2
2
9
Fresno (CA)
4
1
20
Hartford (CN)
1
0
4
Houston (TX)
8
10
15
Indianapolis (IN)
1
2
3
Jacksonville (FL)
5
2
27
Kansas City (KS)
1
1
7
Kansas City (MO)
2
6
4
Las Vegas (NV)
1
59
500
Little Rock (AR)
2
1
29
Los Angeles (CA)
5
5
16
Louisville (KY)
6
2
26
Memphis (TN)
10
7
38
Miami (FL)
8
2
38
Minneapolis (MN)
3
0
14
Mobile (AL)
1
1
4
Nashville (TN)
2
3
6
New Orleans (LA)
11
14
35
Newark (NJ)
5
5
15
New York City (NYC)
8
4
44
Omaha (NE)
2
0
10
Philadelphia (PA)
13
8
51
Phoenix (AR)
2
1
7
Pittsburg (PA)
1
2
2
Pompano Beach (FL)
1
17
14
Richmond (VA)
2
2
7
Sacramento (CA)
4
1
17
Saginaw (MI)
2
0
10
Saint Louis (MO)
12
18
34
Saint Paul (MN)
1
4
1
San Antonio (TX)
2
1
8
San Diego (CA)
2
2
11
San Francisco (CA)
6
6
24
Santa Fe (TX)
1
10
13
Seattle (WA)
1
2
2
Sutherland Springs (TX)
1
27
20
Stockton (CA)
1
3
2
Tampa (FL)
1
0
4
Toledo (OH)
1
0
4
Topeka (KS)
1
4
1
Trenton (NJ)
2
2
6
Virginia Beach (VA)
1
1
3
Washington DC
8
3
33

Source of raw data: Gun Violence Archive (GVA). Gun Violence Archive is an online archive of gun violence incidents collected from over 1,200 media, government and commercial sources daily in an effort to provide near-real time data about the results of gun violence. Gun Violence Archive (GVA) is a not-for-profit corporation formed in 2013 to provide free online public access to accurate information about gun-related violence in the United States. GVA collects and checks for accuracy, comprehensive information about gun-related violence in the US.

• Mass shootings are defined as shooting incidents of four or more killed or injured, not including the shooter(s).

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