New York City Mayor Michael R Bloomberg

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg
City Hall
New York
NY 10007
USA
Tel: +1 212 788 9600
Fax: +1 212 788 2460
Internet: www.nyc.gov
Email: nyc.gov/html/mail/
html/mayor.html



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This is an archived article published in September 2003
New York commemorates
the events of 11 September
By Josh Fecht, US Editor

US Vice President Dick Cheney, New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and New York Governor George E. Pataki led the commemoration of the second anniversary of the 11 September 2001 attack. As with the 2002 commemoration, the City’s observance took place at the World Trade Center site on the morning of Thursday, 11 September.

Terrorist attack on London

Children played a large role in the 2003 ceremony by reading the names of the victims and performing music throughout the program. The ceremony paused four times – twice to mark the times that each plane hit the towers and twice to mark the times when each tower fell. The first moment of silence was at 8:46 a.m. and many houses of worship citywide tolled their bells at that time. While the names were read out, family members descended the ramp to the lowest level of the site where they layed flowers. Former Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, New Jersey Governor James E. McGreevey also attended the ceremony.

At sunset, the 'Tribute in Light’ returned for one night as a tribute to the memory of those lost and a symbol of the spirit of the City of New York. The ‘Tribute in Light’ is being brought back each year for one night on 11 September.

“On this 11 September, the hearts and minds of our City, our country and freedom-loving people from around the world, again turn toward the World Trade Center site,” said Mayor Bloomberg. “This is be the second time that we, as friends, as families, and as one community, gather to remember a tragic day which has become synonymous with not only great sorrow and loss, but also courage and resilience.”

“We will never forget the individual lives that were lost, the tremendous personal sacrifices and the countless acts of heroism that will forever mark 11 September, 2001 as a day the world changed forever,” said Governor Pataki. “Those heroes will be forever in the hearts and minds of people throughout New York State and around the World. New Yorkers have shown an incredible strength and the ability to unite in the face of tragedy.




The 'Tribute of Light', which returns to New York City each year on 11 September. (Photo: NYC press department)

The 11 September 2003 commemoration program:
7:00 AM Guests begin to gather at the World Trade Center site
8:30 AM Program begins. Introduction of citywide moment of silence
8:46 AM Moment of silence (observance of time first plane struck North Tower)
(Houses of worship toll their bells throughout the City). Introduction of the reading of the names. Children begin reading of names in pairs. The names are read by children related to those lost. Each child reads approximately 14 names. There will be 100 pairs (200 readers) who will continue until all names are read
8:47 AM Families begin to descend ramp to the lowest level of the site where they lay flowers.
9:03 AM Moment of silence (observance of time second plane struck South Tower)
Reading of names continues/music resumes.
9:59 AM Moment of silence (observance of time of fall of the South Tower)
Reading of names continues/music resumes.
10:29 AM: Moment of silence (observance of time of fall of the North Tower).
Reading of names continues/music resumes. Reading of names concludes.
12:00 PM: Taps performed by two trumpeters (NYPD and FDNY). Final music performance. Program ends.