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UK and European cities compared
Urban population growth from now to 2030
World's largest cities
and their mayors 2011

World's largest cities 2007
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Largest cities in the world
Largest urban areas
Largest European cities
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Largest Spanish cities
Largest Indian cities
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Urbanisation 2008 to 2030


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A comparison of UK
and European cities

Research by City Mayors, Eurostat and the UK Office for National Statistics

21 February 2013: Almost 13 per cent of the UK population live in London. With the exception of Vienna, no other major European capital city is home to such a high proportion of its country’s citizens. Recent research by City Mayors shows that 20.2 per cent of Austrians live in Vienna, 12.9 per cent of Britons call London their home, while 12.4 per of Norwegians reside in Oslo. Helsinki, Copenhagen and Brussels also house more than ten per cent of their respective national populations. But less than five per cent of the people of France, Germany, Poland and Italy live in their respective capital cities.

Separate research by the UK’s Office for National Statistics and the European office of statistics Eurostat shows that London has the highest house prices in Europe, that Sheffield suffers more from particle pollution than any other UK city and that between 2003, that 2008 Oslo was the fastest growing city in Europe and that UK cities have the highest infant mortality in Europe..

• European capitals
• UK and European cities
• Population change
• Old age dependency
• Infant mortality
• Particle pollution
• House prices
• Car ownership

European capitals with the highest
percentage of their countries’ residents
Capital city (country)
City population (in millions)
Country population (in millions)
Percentage of national population living in capital
Vienna (Austria)
1.7
8.4
20.24%
London (UK)
8.1
63.1
12.84%
Oslo (Norway)
0.62
5.0
12.40%
Helsinki (Finland)
0.6
5.4
11.11%
Copenhagen (Denmark)
0.56
5.6
10.00%
Brussels (Belgium)
1.1
11.0
10.00%
Stockholm (Sweden)
0.87
9.5
9.16%
Dublin (Ireland)
0.53
6.4
8.28%
Moscow (Russia)
11.5
143.3
8.03%
Madrid (Spain)
3.3
47.3
6.98%
Athens (Greece)
0.65
10.8
6.02%
Lisbon (Portugal)
0.55
10.6
5.19%
Amsterdam (Netherlands)
0.82
16.7
4.91%
Zurich (Switzerland)*
0.38
8.0
4.75%
Rome (Italy)
2.8
60.8
4.61%
Warsaw (Poland)
1.7
38.2
4.45%
Berlin (Germany)
3.5
81.8
4.28%
Paris (France)
2.2
65.4
3.36%
Source: City Mayors
*Zurich is Switzerland's largest city. Bern is the country's capital.

Cities researched by the UK Office
for National Statistics and Eurostat

City
Country
City population
London UK
8,170,000
Berlin Germany
3,520,000
Madrid Spain
3,265,000
Birmingham UK
1,019,000
Cologne Germany
995,000
Stockholm Sweden
872,000
Valencia Spain
807,000
Leeds UK
779,000
Oslo Norway
624,000
Glasgow UK
584,000
Sheffield UK
540,000
Hannover Germany
520,000
Bradford UK
501,000
Gothenburg Sweden
500,000
Manchester UK
473,000
Edinburgh UK
472,000
Liverpool UK
441,000
Murcia Spain
431,000
Bristol UK
426,000
Cardiff UK
330,000
Belfast UK
268,000
Bergen Norway
248,000

Population change
(Average annual population change between 2003 and 2008 in %)

The table shows that Oslo, Murcia and Manchester have seen the largest annual growth of around two per cent, while Belfast was the only city in this comparison to have seen a population decline.
City
Population change
in %
Oslo
2.0
Murcia
1.9
Manchester
1.8
Bristol
1.7
Leeds
1.5
Stockholm
1.3
Bergen
1.2
Cardiff
1.2
Göteborg
1.0
Bradford
1.0
Edinburgh
1.0
Sheffield
0.9
Madrid
0.8
London
0.8
Valencia
0.7
Köln
0.6
Birmingham
0.6
Berlin
0.3
Glasgow
0.2
Hannover
0.1
Liverpool
0.0
Belfast
-0.2
Source: Eurostat

Old age dependency
(Ratio of population aged 65 plus against those aged 20 to 64)

The table shows that three German cities – Hannover, Berlin and Cologne – have some of the highest old-age dependency ratio, while London and Manchester have some of the ratios.
City
Ratio of older against younger
Hannover
31.4
Madrid
29.1
Berlin
29.0
Köln
28.6
Valencia
26.7
Bergen
23.2
Bradford
23.2
Liverpool
23.1
Göteborg
22.9
Birmingham
22.8
Leeds
22.6
Edinburgh
22.1
Glasgow
22.0
Stockholm
21.8
Cardiff
21.4
Murcia
20.8
Oslo
18.2
London
17.8
Manchester
16.6
Source: Eurostat

Infant mortality
The table shows that all UK cities suffer from higher infant mortality than their European counterparts.
City
Infant mortality per 1,000 live births
Birmingham
8.0
Bradford
8.0
Glasgow
6.0
Manchester
6.0
Bristol
6.0
Leeds
5.0
Liverpool
5.0
Edinburgh
5.0
Murcia
4.0
London
4.0
Inner London
4.0
Cardiff
4.0
Sheffield
4.0
Berlin
3.0
Köln
3.0
Hannover
3.0
Madrid
3.0
Valencia
3.0
Oslo
3.0
Bergen
2.0
Stockholm
2.0
Göteborg
2.0
Belfast
n/a
Source: Eurostat

Particle pollution
Number of days particulate matter concentrations (PM10) exceeds 50 µg/m. UK cities appear to be more polluted than the other European cities.
City
Days
Sheffield
17.0
Bristol
15.0
Madrid
11.5
Birmingham
11.0
Leeds
10.0
Liverpool
10.0
Manchester
10.0
London
9.4
Cardiff
9.0
Berlin
8.8
Hannover
7.0
Belfast
7.0
Köln
6.0
Glasgow
4.5
Oslo
4.0
Göteborg
3.0
Bergen
2.0
Stockholm
2.0
Edinburgh
0.0
Valencia
n/a
Murcia
n/a
Bradford
n/a
Source: Eurostat

House prices
House prices are the major factor in the cost of living as they affect mortgage and rent costs.
City
Average price of a house
(per m2 in euros)
London*
5280
Madrid
4285
Oslo
3966
Stockholm
3640
Edinburgh
3164
Valencia
3055
Köln
2800
Bergen
2798
Göteborg
2797
Bristol
2310
Belfast
2199
Cardiff
2085
Murcia
2084
Manchester
2041
Glasgow
2034
Leeds
2026
Birmingham
1962
Sheffield
1902
Berlin
1900
Bradford
1813
Hannover
1800
Liverpool
1740
Sources: Eurostat and *City Mayors

Car ownership
Number of cars registered per 1,000 population
The three Spanish cities, Murcia, Madrid and Valencia, have the highest level of car ownership, while the UK cities, Liverpool Glasgow and Manchester have a relative low level of car ownership.

City
Cars per
1,000 people
Murcia
493.0
Madrid
484.6
Valencia
484.1
Bergen
448.7
Hannover
396.6
Oslo
378.4
Cardiff
374.7
Stockholm
369.8
Bristol
367.9
Bradford
351.6
Köln
349.7
Göteborg
349.1
Sheffield
345.1
Leeds
338.8
Birmingham
328.5
Edinburgh
319.4
London
317.2
Berlin
285.6
Liverpool
282.9
Glasgow
259.1
Manchester
255.5
Belfast
n/a
Source: Eurostat





Between 2003 and 2008 Oslo enjoyed the strongest population growth in Europe


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