Frontage of Chicago's City Hall



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City Mayors deals with urban transport issues in developed and developing countries and features the world’s greatest metro systems. More


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City Mayors questions those who govern the world’s cities and talks to men and women who contribute to urban society and environment. More


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City Mayors lists cities and city organisations, profiles individual mayors and provides information on hundreds of urban events. More


City Mayors reports news from towns and cities around the world. Worldwide | Elections | North America | Latin America | Europe | Asia | Africa |


City Mayors ranks the world’s largest, best as well as richest cities and urban areas. It also ranks the cities in individual countries, and provides a list of the capital cities of some 200 sovereign countries. More


City Mayors profiles city leaders from around the world. More


City Mayors describes the history, architecture and politics of the greatest city halls in the world. More


Mayors from The Americas, Europe. Asia, Australia and Africa compete for the World Mayor Award. More


Use
Mayor Monitor to rate the performance of mayors from across the world More


In your opinion: Praise Criticise. Write


City Mayors reports political events, analyses the issues and depicts the main players. More


City Mayors describes and explains the structures and workings of local government in Europe, The Americas, Asia, Australia and Africa. More


City Mayors deals with economic and investment issues affecting towns and cities. More


City Mayors describes and explains financial issues affecting local government. More


City Mayors reports urban environmental developments and examines the challenges faced by cities worldwide. More


City Mayors reports on and discusses urban development issues in developed and developing countries. More


City Mayors reports on developments in urban society and behaviour and reviews relevant research. More


City Mayors invites readers to write about the people in their cities. More


City Mayors examines city brands and marketing. More


City Mayors lists and features urban events, conferences and conventions aimed at urban decision makers and those with an interst in cities worldwide. More



City Mayors deals with urban transport issues in developed and developing countries and features the world’s greatest metro systems. More


City Mayors examines education issues and policies affecting children and adults in urban areas. More


City Mayors investigates health issues affecting urban areas with an emphasis on health in cities in developing countries. More


City Mayors reports on how business developments impact on cities and examines cooperation between cities and the private sector. More


City Mayors examines the contributions history and culture make to urban society and environment. More


City Mayors examines the importance of urban tourism to city economies. More


City Mayors questions those who govern the world’s cities and talks to men and women who contribute to urban society and environment. More


City Mayors profiles national and international organisations representing cities as well as those dealing with urban issues. More


City Mayors reports on major national and international sporting events and their impact on cities. More


City Mayors lists cities and city organisations, profiles individual mayors and provides information on hundreds of urban events. More


Chicago City Hall
By Gregor Gosciniak

12 February 2007: Chicago City Hall, located between the famous James R. Thompson Centre and the Richard J. Daley Centre, is the City of Chicago’s official seat of government. The eleven-storey building, nearly a century old, is situated on a block surrounded by La Salle Street, Washington Street, Clark Street and Randolph Street. It was designed by the well-known architectural firm of Holabird & Roche, which was founded in the city in 1880 and responsible for building major Chicago landmarks such as Soldier Field and the Palmer House - which is now the Palmer House Hilton Hotel.

City Hall was built in the classical revival style common to those days. On 27 February 1911 the Town Hall was officially dedicated. The entrance hall features four granite panels, each representing an area of public works of particular interest to those times – and which still are today: water supply, schools, parks and playgrounds.

Visitors and staff entering the building are greeted with huge marble stairways and bronze tablets depicting the city halls of Chicago’s, past from 1837 onwards. The first major renovation was in 1967 when a number of city departments, originally located outside Chicago City Hall, were moved into the building - which was always considered to be more representative then other city buildings.

Today Chicago City Hall houses the offices of the well known Mayor Richard M. Daley who has earned a national reputation for his innovative, community-based programs to address education, public safety, neighbourhood development and other challenges facing American cities.

Chicago City Council holds it meetings in the west side of the building. The east side of the building is dedicated to a number of offices of Cook County, and is nicknamed “County Building”.

An unusual feature of City Hall is its rooftop garden, opened in 2001, and designed to discover more about how green roofs influence the heat effect of urban areas. Other topics for study are rainwater runoff and the effectiveness of differing types of green roof projects and plant species for Chicago's climate.

Incidentally, Chicago’s nickname “the windy City” relates not so much to its climate but more accurately to the old days when city politicians had a reputation for being “windy”!


Roof garden of Chicago's City Hall


Also by Gregor Gosciniak
New York City Hall
New York City is one of the few metropolises in the world that does not require an introduction. Its many attractions, including Brooklyn Bridge, the Statue of Liberty, Central Park, the Empire State Building and the Museum of Modern Art, are featured every day in journals across the world. However, New York’s beautiful City Hall is largely ignored by travel writers, even though is it one of the most treasured buildings the city has to offer.

Built between 1803 and 1811 by Joseph Francois Mangin and John McComb Junior, New York City Hall was officially opened in 1812. Since then it has been the official seat of the New York City government and the Mayor of the City. The building is located in the small City Hall Park overshadowed to the much better known Municipal Building.

New York’s first City Hall was build by the Dutch in the 17th century on Pearl Street. The city’s second City Hall, built in 1700, stood on Wall and Nassau Streets. After New York became the official capital of the US, the name of the City Hall was changed to Federal Hall. Plans for building a new, representative City Hall were discussed by New York City Council as early as 1776, but the financial strains of the War of Independence put a stop to it.